Richard Louv: Audubon Recognition

The National Audubon Society today named author Richard Louv as the 50th recipient of the prestigious Audubon Medal for sounding the alarm about the health and societal costs of children’s isolation from the natural world—and for sparking a growing movement to remedy the problem.

A former columnist for the San Diego Union-Tribune and author of seven books, Louv gained wide attention through his acclaimed book, Last Child in the Woods. The book reveals a direct connection between the absence of nature in the lives of today’s wired youth and its negative health and societal impacts, a phenomenon Louv terms “Nature-Deficit Disorder.”

…Established in 1947, the Audubon Medal has been bestowed on a wide array of influential environmentalists in recognition of outstanding achievement in the field of conservation and environmental protection. This distinguished environmental honor recognizes either a single, extraordinary feat or a record of significant contributions. Past recipients include Presidents (Jimmy Carter), Authors (Rachel Carson), Scientists (E.O. Wilson) and Philanthropists (The Rockefeller Family)

…from the Child and Nature Network


About fred

Fred First holds masters degrees in Vertebrate Zoology and physical therapy, and has been a biology teacher and physical therapist by profession. He moved to southwest Virginia in 1975 and to Floyd County in 1997. He maintains a daily photo-blog, broadcasts essays on the Roanoke NPR station, and contributes regular columns for the Floyd Press and Roanoke's Star Sentinel. His two non-fiction books, Slow Road Home and his recent What We Hold in Our Hands, celebrate the riches that we possess in our families and communities, our natural bounty, social capital and Appalachian cultures old and new. He has served on the Jacksonville Center Board of Directors and is newly active in the Sustain Floyd organization. He lives in northeastern Floyd County on the headwaters of the Roanoke River.

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