Second Week: June Books Sale

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And oh it is such a nice week in June with low humidity, cool nights and pleasantly-warm days. Lots of hay-making going on.

And you know to make hay while the sunshines, so you also know to order books while the sale shines.

Thanks to those who have ordered, I have a shipment going to the PO tomorrow, so it won’t be long until they arrive at your door.

If you’ve been waiting, don’t. The rains will come and winds will blow and your hay will be all lodged over and go to waste. And you won’t even have any books from Goose Creek to see you through such a tragedy!

Click the PICTURE to go right to the order form, or QUICK CHECK-OUT: forget the order form (for my accounting purposes) and send payment by cash or check today to

Fred First, 1020 Goose Creek Run, Check VA 24072

And many thanks for supporting your local authors in all places. We do it because we all expect to get rich, but some of us actually have a passion for sharing and love the language and all it makes possible between us.

 Both Fred’s Books for $18. Period. 

Try to Find the Words

I walked lightly through the house, coffee in hand, with only the lightning showing the way to the front door this morning. Quietly, Ann still asleep, I slipped out onto the porch and sat in the swing while my eyes learned to see in darkness. The fireflies were mesmerizing. 

So familiar. Twelve years ago today, my writing passion began with this passage that appears very early in Slow Road Home. Twelve years and a mountain of words later, I still have to ask “how should I then live” in these days I’ve been granted?  

It is late, and I am last to bed, past the usual time. I step out onto the front porch into the cool, sweet air of early June, and sit on the top step quietly as if not to disturb the wildlife, whose nocturnal day I am entering.

The pasture grasses just beyond the maples are in full flower and their pollen smells like midnight bread baking, while Goose Creek sends up wafts of spearmint, wet mud and turbulence.

My eyes soon learn to see in darkness and I am aware of soundless flashes of summer lightning, and stars overhead. My night vision comes and goes with each flash and pause and flash.

Rising from the dark field on the fragrance of grasses are tens of thousands of lightning bugs. Put them in a jar, shake and see them illumined with the cold translucence of memory. They pulse and rise above the field in counterpoint to the tempo of the clouds, signaling ancient syllables that we could understand, if we were more often still, less hurried, and more at home in our own pastures.

Gravity pulls me down and I lie on my back, on cool stone horizontal, before a mock-infinity of space, wondering what is my place in this world of men and of words? Do I deserve to be so blessed among Earth’s teeming humanity? What must I do in the warmth of this gentle epiphany that is revealed to me tonight and how should I then live?

Maybe I will try to find the words in the morning, after the house is quiet again, and the fireflies have gone to bed, and the world smells of heat and ozone and toast.

Author’s Note Slow Road Home

You will find a few moments of pleasant reading in this book, I trust. More than this, it is my hope that as you look out at my world through my eyes, you will come to know the “Ah, Aha, and Haha” realities in your own life. Looking through this lens at the terrain of your daily life may offer clarity and depth to your seeing, to your understanding and to your caring for the places and people in your own local habitat.
 
It’s a risky business exposing one’s thoughts and fears, memories and hopes to strangers. But I’m convinced that from this kind of unselfconscious hyper-local personal story-telling, you’ll discover that you and I are not all that different.
 
In the end, there’s no them and us; there’s only us. We can and must grow together in our families and communities, building our future upon each other’s humor and courage, wisdom and strength of character—now more than ever. 

NOTE: The image for this post became the cover for Slow Road Home and is one of the “Country Roads” photo note cards you can purchase at my Etsy Store, Goose Creek Goods