Flowing, Together

I’ve always liked the word “confluence” for the fact that, if I could see  and hear through the wall in front of me, I’d experience the joining music and rush of Goose Creek where it merges with Nameless Creek.

Both of “our” creeks are jump-across-able streams alone; together they gain breadth and depth, power and voice.

So I woke up this morning with a gentle rain on the metal roof overhead and have been spinning over and over this notion of flowing together.  It is uncertainties and ideas, fears and hopes of my neighbors that are coming together now in an exciting, bewildering, hopeful confluence.

So I’ll get these water/pipeline/convergence bits out of my head all at once, and you’ll see way too many versions of Goose Creek Mill Dam–a place that represents for me the coming together of human history and need that find its story along waterways, as is so very often the case.

Here’s a “this I believe” short statement about Floyd County water.

And here, at Medium, an essay that was published in the Floyd Press on Thursday and Roanoke Times yesterday, in the event that you might want to read it again, or for the first time. [It’s a BIG image, so scroll down to see the text.]

I’m done. Tomorrow, maybe mushrooms!

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fred

Fred First holds masters degrees in Vertebrate Zoology and physical therapy, and has been a biology teacher and physical therapist by profession. He moved to southwest Virginia in 1975 and to Floyd County in 1997. He maintains a daily photo-blog, broadcasts essays on the Roanoke NPR station, and contributes regular columns for the Floyd Press and Roanoke's Star Sentinel. His two non-fiction books, Slow Road Home and his recent What We Hold in Our Hands, celebrate the riches that we possess in our families and communities, our natural bounty, social capital and Appalachian cultures old and new. He has served on the Jacksonville Center Board of Directors and is newly active in the Sustain Floyd organization. He lives in northeastern Floyd County on the headwaters of the Roanoke River.

2 thoughts on “Flowing, Together”

  1. I’m so glad you got the article published in the two papers! I believe all these years of reading and writing have made you ready to fight the good fight in this big battle with the gas pipeline.

  2. Excellent article, Fred. I can’t seem to read it at the link you provided. I just see the photo but the print is too small and I found no scrolling to be helpful.

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