October 08, 2002

Say What?

I grew up southern. There are just some words that I have always thought everybody knew and used. It comes as a great shock to me to discover that this is not so. Take, for instance, the perfectly good word "tump".

In everyday usage, you might say "Keerful, don't tump over yore trike". Or, "go tump out 'at bucket a' taters and fetch it back to the house".

Now I go and learn over at Possumblog that apparently, there are those that feel that its usage should raise eyebrows.

Show of hands: how many Fragments readers never hear'd of this wonderful and useful word? Come on. Fess up. Bless ya l'il hearts.


Posted by fred1st at October 8, 2002 08:49 PM
Comments

Neeeever heard of it.

I'm guessing, though, that Yiddish isn't big in the boondocks. ;-)

Posted by: Meryl Yourish at October 8, 2002 10:00 PM

[Raising hand at back of classroom]: Ummm, Mr. First? Will this be on the test?

;-)

Posted by: Curt at October 8, 2002 11:59 PM

Tump? Nope. Definitely not an East Tennessee word.

I've got a dope and a moon pie in yonder. The nice lady at the store put 'em in a poke for me. I'll just go and savor those epicurean delights whilst I cogitate on tump.

Posted by: Jim at October 9, 2002 09:04 AM

Je n' comprende pas....tump? Blog on!

Posted by: Bene Diction at October 9, 2002 09:24 PM

Tump? I'm going to try this one in my next game of Yahoo! Word Racer and see what they say. If I get "no such word" then honey, there ain't no such word.

Posted by: michele at October 10, 2002 07:36 AM

From Mr. Webster his own sef...I'll have you know.

Main Entry: 2tump
Function: verb
Etymology: perhaps akin to British dialect tumpoke to fall head over heels
Date: 1967
intransitive senses chiefly Southern : to tip or turn over especially accidentally -- usually used with over
transitive senses, chiefly Southern : to cause to tip over : OVERTURN, UPSET -- usually used with over

Posted by: fredf at October 10, 2002 08:02 AM

Well, all I can say is: try it out next time you see someone or something tumping over. Did you see that possum tump over? or: Yup, dern kid tumped right over in that mudhole. (Yah, it's ok to split the conjugated form from the auxiliary.) An extremely satisfying word.

Posted by: Quana at October 10, 2002 11:10 PM

As a native Arkansan, I know exactly what it means to tump. I heard it on float trips down the Buffalo and White rivers all my life. If you tump over your canoe, you will end up all wet. And then you have to retrieve your beers before they float away.

Posted by: Kris at October 12, 2002 05:46 AM

Yeah, I thought it was just in Texas as in the dog tumped over the garbage can or I tumped over the coffee cup. Here's a fun one, "ice house"; I think it's local only to San Antonio and environs and means a convenience store (ie 7-11)

Posted by: Tom at December 3, 2002 08:33 PM

Yeah, I thought it was just in Texas as in the dog tumped over the garbage can or I tumped over the coffee cup. Here's a fun one, "ice house"; I think it's local only to San Antonio and environs and means a convenience store (ie 7-11)

Posted by: Tom at December 3, 2002 08:33 PM

It is common in at least one mid-sized city. I grew up in Louisville, Ky., and many people in Louisville use this word. I've spoken with several people from rural Kentucky, and they swear it's a "big city" word. I don't say "y'all" or "aint," but I do say "tump."

Posted by: mike at December 4, 2002 01:58 PM

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